VIDEO: TFLC takes a ride in the Audi e-tron on Pikes Peak

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Audi has been making a bit deal about its new e-tron and its regenerative braking. While all electric cars use regenerative braking, which takes the kinetic energy of the car and sends it back into the battery and, in turn, slowing the car down, the e-tron’s regen braking is capable of increasing total battery range by an extraordinary amount. To prove this, Audi brought its upcoming electric SUV to Pikes Peak, one of the most difficult mountain passes in the world, to show off what its regen braking can do. TFLC was among the journalists present and not only allows us to see the Audi e-tron up close but see how well its regen works.

Coasting down the many steep, serpentine miles of Pikes Peak, the Audi e-tron was actually able to increase its total range to far more than what it started out with, simply by regenerative braking. What Audi seems to keep boasting is the fact that the e-tron has three different stages of regen, controllable by the paddle shifters on the steering wheel. The lowest level of regen basically doesn’t really do anything, allowing the car to coast and roll without any additional drag. The highest level can bring the e-tron to a complete stop without the driver ever touching the brake pedal.

This video shows us a lot of the Audi e-tron in motion and we get to learn a lot about its technical information and the way it works from one of its engineers, Mike Curtis. But the most impressive thing is that, after the first leg of Pikes Peak where brake temperatures can get up in the 800-900 degree Fahrenheit range, the e-tron’s brakes only measured in at 45 degrees, which is actually cold. So the physical friction brakes were barely being used and possibly weren’t used at all.

We also get to see its cool side-mirror cameras at work, its awesome interior and some of its impressive performance. We’re incredibly excited about the Audi e-tron and this video is only building the hype even more.