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Audi Traffic Light Information Expands to Düsseldorf, Germany

When Audi first introduced its Traffic Light Information system, it was only in a few select US-market cities. For instance, it first launched in Las Vegas, Nevada and then expanded into other US cities such as Washington D.C. Now, the new traffic light system is further expanding on the other side of the Atlantic, making its way to Düsseldorf, Germany.

 

Düsseldorf isn’t the first European city, or even the first German city, to get Audi’s Traffic Light Information system. Ingolstadt, the home of Audi, was the first. Now, though, the city on the Rhine river will be getting it as well.

 

Starting this month, 150 intersections in Düsseldorf will be compatible with this system, allowing Audi drivers to “catch the green wave”. By Summer, almost all intersections in Düsseldorf, about 450 of the 600, will be compatible with Traffic Light Information. 

 

Audi’s Traffic Light Information system is comprised of two separate technologys; Green Light Optimized Speed Advisory (GLOSA) and Time-to-Green. The former is the one that allows Audi drivers to “catch the green wave”, as it gives the driver an approximate speed to go to catch the next green light. This way, drivers spend more time on the move, rather than wasting time stuck at red lights. Not only is that a nicer drive but it also helps reduce emissions and improve fuel economy.

 

The latter technology, Time-to-Green, tells Audi drivers how much time is left until a red light turns green. So if you do happen to be stopped at a red light, the driver can relax, knowing exactly when it’s going to turn green.

 

According to some studies conducted by Audi, these two technologies combine to help make drivers more drive more efficiently. That increase in efficiency has helped drivers reduce fuel consumption by 15-percent. That’s huge for just improved traffic light technology.

 

“With Audi Traffic Light Information we wish to improve convenience for drivers, increase traffic safety and encourage an economical style of driving that looks ahead,” says Andre Hainzlmaier, head of development for Apps, Connected Services and Smart City at Audi.

 

“To do this, we have to predict precisely how traffic lights will behave in the next two minutes. At the same time, exact forecasts are the biggest challenge. Most signals react variably to traffic volume and continuously adapt the intervals at which they switch between red and green.”

Nico DeMattia

I've been in love with cars since I was a kid, specifically German cars. Now I get to drive them talk about them on the internet.